Caves in Northern Canada provide a history of ancient permafrost

Geoscientist sheds new light on permafrost thaw in the geologic past and what it could mean for our future

Caves in Northern Canada provide a history of ancient permafrostGeoscientists have uncovered surprising results that reveal a complex history of ancient permafrost thaw – with implications for understanding the effects of permafrost thawing and climate change in the Canadian Arctic today. “Permafrost is really a geological expression of climate, so permafrost response to past periods of global warming is like a natural experiment for…

3-D bioprinting successfully used to create nose cartilage

Searching for a better solution to a clinical problem facing many patients with skin cancer

A team of University of Alberta researchers has discovered a way to use 3-D bioprinting technology to create custom-shaped cartilage for use in surgical procedures. The work aims to make it easier for surgeons to safely restore the features of skin cancer patients living with nasal cartilage defects after surgery. The researchers used a specially…

$2M boost for the development of new varieties of wheat

To introduce new varieties of earlier-maturing, higher-yielding wheat for Western Canadian growers

$2M boost for the development of new varieties of wheatUniversity of Alberta research to develop earlier-maturing, more disease-resistant wheat for Western Canadian growers is being boosted, thanks to $2 million in support from the Canadian Wheat Research Coalition. A five-year agreement between CWRC and the Faculty of Agricultural, Life & Environmental Sciences (ALES) supports the development of up to five new wheat varieties for use by farmers…

Student helps unearth the story of a 3,000-year-old tragedy

Master’s research reveals clues into the lives of four people who perished in a fire in the late Bronze Age

Student helps unearth the story of a 3,000-year-old tragedyMore than 3,000 years ago, four people were incinerated and crushed in a blazing fire in the south central city of Azekah, Israel. Their remains were trapped in rubble until discovered by Tel Aviv University archeologists in 2012. That’s when Karl Berendt began volunteering at the excavation site as an undergraduate student at the University…

Students bring Indigenous perspectives to Wikipedia

Increasing the diversity of voices and having a few people making small and steady changes can lead to a big movement

Students bring Indigenous perspectives to WikipediaLast fall, students in a Native Studies course worked to improve representations of Indigenous peoples on one of the most popular websites in the world. The course, Colonialism and the Criminal Justice System, saw students create Wikipedia articles on issues that dealt with Indigenous peoples and Canada’s criminal legal system, filling some of the site’s…

Testing for more sensitive ways to diagnose rare diseases

Adding RNA sequencing to current genetic methods could help diagnose and treat thousands of patients with mystery diseases

Testing for more sensitive ways to diagnose rare diseasesImagine having a terrible medical condition and not knowing what it was. More than 400,000 Albertans have a rare disease. Many of them face challenges getting the right diagnosis, let alone finding the right specialist and obtaining effective treatment. Some cases are deadly; others can have a major impact on a patient’s day-to-day life. Advances…

Nanomedicine used to provide better outcomes during chemotherapy

Nanomedicine used to provide better outcomes during chemotherapyA University of Alberta researcher is using nanotechnology to improve the effectiveness of chemotherapy treatments for cancer patients and reduce their side effects. Afsaneh Lavasanifar is a professor in the University of Alberta’s Faculty of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences and an adjunct professor in the Department of Chemical and Medical Engineering. Her lab develops precision health solutions through nanomedicine,…

Archeology can play a powerful role for Indigenous rights

New director of U of A institute sees her mission as reimagining the relationship between archeology and Indigenous histories

Métis archeologist Dr. Kisha Supernant views her mission as nothing less than a radical reimagining of her discipline. “Archeology’s history is grounded in settler colonialism – this idea that non-Indigenous people come onto the land and interpret Indigenous history by studying their material,” says the new director of the University of Alberta’s Institute for Prairie and…

Research aids in hunt for economically important ore deposits

Including diamonds

Research aids in hunt for economically important ore depositsA new study sheds light on a fundamental mechanism of how Earth’s continental plates heal, with implications for diamond exploration and locating economically important minerals. “Cratons are the oldest stable continental land masses on Earth and are widely known as repositories for diamonds and metals of economic importance,” said Jingao Liu, lead author and visiting…

Innovative cancer therapy uses immune system to attack tumours

Re-engineers your immune system to target and attack cancer growing in your body

Innovative cancer therapy uses immune system to attack tumoursImagine if you could re-engineer your immune system to target and attack cancer growing in your body. A new clinical trial led by a clinician researcher at the University of Alberta is doing just that. Michael Chu, an assistant professor of oncology in the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, is leading a project to manufacture and…
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